Exec Team Recipes: Katarina’s Chocolate Chia Pudding


As part of our team’s continuing commitment to sustainability in our everyday lives, we have launched a new series — Exec Team Recipes! On this blog, we’ll share our favourite vegan recipes. Enjoy!


By Katarina Krivokapic

This vegan chia chocolate pudding is so filling and delicious, plus it can be eaten for dessert or breakfast. It’s super easy to make and can be prepared overnight. Chia seeds have a lot of fiber and healthy fats, and are hydrophilic, meaning they absorb liquid, creating a healthy, delicious pudding!

For this recipe, I used homemade oat milk – feel free to substitute to your liking with cow or other plant milks!

Ingredients for 1 serving:

1/4 cup chia seeds

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 tablespoon cocoa powder

1/4 teaspoon instant coffee

1/4 tsp vanilla

a few grains of salt

1/2 cup oat milk

Mason jar with lid

Directions:

  1. Shake the dry ingredients together in a closed mason jar
  2. Add the milk and shake once again, making sure there is no clumps
  3. Refrigerate for 4+ hours, preferably overnight.
  4. Enjoy!

YHD Blogs – Nada Grocery


This article is part of our “Youth Head Delegate Blog Series” — written by our YHDs! 


By Jenna D. 

Plastics have become present in everyday items we use like grocery bags, straws, water bottles, body wash bottles, toothbrushes; these are just a few of the things we use every day made out of plastic. Using plastics has a detrimental effect on marine life. Each year a shocking 8 million tonnes of plastic pollutes the waters. Plastic can take a decade or even hundreds of years to decompose as it is not biodegradable. Microplastics have been found in lakes, oceans, rivers, and, streams which make their way into our food and water. Plastics lower the quality of water as plastics contain many toxic compounds. The United Nations Environment Programme estimates that there may be around 51 trillion microplastic particles in the ocean and these numbers are extremely concerning. We all enjoy the privilege of having clean drinking water here in Canada, but we need to make sure we also pay attention to the alarming amount of plastics ending up in it. Canadians annually use 700 plastic bags, 720 single-use cups, 1025 plastic bottles, and 730 straws. These plastics pose a threat to us and marine life.

 

We all appreciate how the oceans contain some of the most beautiful marine life like whales, sharks, different types of fish, corals, and other living organisms. Our consumption of plastic, however, is putting aquatic animals’ lives at risk. Many marine lives end up choking to death, consuming the plastic that causes digestive problems, or receiving lacerations that get infected, which affect their ability to swim. Reports have concluded that around one million seabirds and one hundred thousand marine mammals are killed every year by consuming plastics. Roughly 44% of seabird species have been documented to have plastic debris in or around their body. Seabirds will mistake plastic for fish and will end up consuming the plastic, which can result in their death. Many animals have and are still being affected by marine plastics, but it not only affects them but also affects us.

 

In Canada, we can see plastic wash up on shore which, poses a threat to marine life and us. Many people enjoy eating seafood, especially fish, however as marine life like fish consume plastic and we then consume that fish that might have had eaten microplastics, it will affect us. For us to be consuming these plastics can lead to many serious problems like cancer, immune system problems, and congenital disabilities. Consuming microplastics put our health at risk but, there are many things that we can do to help there be less plastic ending up in our waters.

We have now learned that not only does plastic pose a threat to marine lives, but it affects us as well. Now you may be asking yourself, what can I do to help fewer plastics ending up in our oceans?  Firstly, try to use less plastic and switch to more reusable options like metal or glass water bottles, bags, mugs, or straws to help reduce the usage of single-use plastic. Secondly, you can educate yourself and others on how plastic affects us and marine life. Lastly, try to encourage local restaurants within your area to switch to more sustainable cutlery, straw, and takeaway boxes.

Many people are aware of this issue yet, spreading more awareness about how plastics are harmful to us and the environment will hopefully encourage people to switch to sustainable options to help save our waters. Educating yourself and others and making small changes will help reduce plastics usage, thus resulting in less of it polluting the water. Making small changes to reduce the amount of plastic ending up in the water will have an overall positive effect.

YHD Blogs – Nada Grocery


This article is part of our “Youth Head Delegate Blog Series” — written by our YHDs! 


By Jenna D. 

Grocery shopping can be more simple and sustainable in our everyday lives, starting with Nada. Nada is a package-free grocery store on a mission to connect people to just food, by linking buyers to suppliers and offering healthy, unpackaged products and services. 

At Nada, connecting people to food in its simplest form is important, and to spark conversations about our local food system as it’s time to get curious about where our food comes from. Nada’s goal is to be part of the climate solution and foster a more just food system, in addition to making changes that prioritize diversity and resilience. Nada supports over 100 local vendors within the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island, and has a host of benefits to our economies, our environment, and our communities. 

There are many tradeoffs between food packaging and waste, but when combined with local sourcing, we’re able to reduce our overall carbon footprint. Choosing to support vendors who prioritize sustainability in their packaging choices, product design, and raw ingredient sourcing is also important as knowing that there are many barriers when it comes to removing waste from the food supply chain

Three of the many things that Nada does are; having a supplier container return program, switching up packaging, and the surplus food challenge. The supplier container return program works with local suppliers, meaning products that come, are package-free too, by delivering shipments in reusable containers from totes to bins. Switching up packaging starts a conversation on how we can choose better packaging and reduce any excess. This is also when reusable containers are not the best option, so swapping virgin materials for 100% recycled content or compostable options, replacing single use items like pallet shrink wrap with reusable moving blankets, or removing the packaging altogether, are other possible options. Food waste is a vastly overlooked driver of climate change. Worldwide, 30% of food is wasted across the supply chain, making up 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions. By tackling this issue on, reducing surplus food in their manufacturing, using imperfect or recovered ingredients in their sourcing, or supporting food insecure households with donations, and biodynamic, regenerative, and urban farms are all part of the solution too!

Nada often finds themselves asking ‘what would nature do?”, as we have a lot to learn from Indigenous wisdom and ecological knowledge, and continue to draw inspiration from the oceans, mountains, and forests in which we get to explore, play, and rest.

YHD Blogs – Is Clean Energy Really Clean?


This article is part of our “Youth Head Delegate Blog Series” — written by our YHDs! 


By Grace L. 

As we strive for a future dependant on renewable energy sources, every method has its pros and cons. 

 

Solar energy has become increasingly popular, growing 35-fold since 2008. However, some argue that the production of solar panels requires fossil fuels and does more harm than good. This being said, cases show solar energy produces three or more times fewer emissions than fossil fuels while generating the same amount of energy. A 2017 study by Nature Energy also shows solar panels producing 26 times the energy required to build and install them. The same thing could be said for wind turbines. Although many have claimed that the production of wind farms is destructive to the environment, the same 2017 survey shows wind turbines producing 44 times the energy required to build and install them. It is true that renewable energy sources still have a carbon footprint, but it is an improvement from fossil fuels. 

 

Many people are concerned about the materials of wind turbines. It takes 800 pounds of copper and rare Earth materials to produce a wind turbine. However, after some research, it is found that the key materials, steel and copper, can be recycled. The fibreglass blades still pose a problem, but the majority of wind turbines are recyclable. 

 

Similarly, people argue about electric vehicles. They say the battery is damaging to the Earth. Valid points can be made from this. Yes, batteries are harmful and the main material, aluminum, requires more energy to produce than steel. However, research has shown that electric cars are better for the environment. Additionally, aluminum is considered one of the most environmentally-friendly metals, able to be recycled many times. 

 

Furthermore, biomass has proved to be a destructive energy source. Biomass burns plant/animal materials to produce energy. The most common material to burn is wood, the very thing we get our oxygen from. Not only that, it is expensive, requires lots of space, and releases fossil fuels while in the burning process. It also produces particle pollution (soot). This can cause asthma attacks, strokes, heart attacks or death. Biomass can also release carbon monoxide, causing nausea, dizziness and sometimes, premature death. These effects can compare to the effects of wildfires. The problem is that many developing countries need it to provide cooking and heating. 

 

In the end, every energy source has its pros and cons. That being said, renewable energy sources have proven over and over again to be better for the environment, unless of course, it is biomass. It is hard to get people to transition away from fossil fuels after depending on them for a long time, but that is something we have to do to turn to cleaner options. Education is the first step in working together to better the future for all of us. 



YHD Blogs – Aviation & The Environment


This article is part of our “Youth Head Delegate Blog Series” — written by our YHDs! 


By David L. 

Being an innovation that connects millions of people across the globe, the word aviation has become synonymous with the fast-paced nature of humanity’s development. Lending itself to facilitating commerce, building families, and ferrying many to their vacation destinations, it’s become inextricably and undeniably tied to our way of life. Yet for all of its benefits it has provided to society, the damage it causes to nature is still overlooked by many. In this blog post we’ll cover the three main ways aviation affects an ecosystem, and what’s being done to counteract these negative effects it has on our biosphere.

 

Firstly, the emissions. Like other modes of transport, aircraft rely on fossil fuels to keep them in the air too, and they create far more emissions than land-based vehicles. Emissions consist of various chemicals and molecules, such as soot, carbon dioxide, unburnt hydrocarbons (such as kerosene, a common jet fuel), and nitrogen oxides, among others, all of which are poisonous to organisms and form a thick blanket that trap heat in the form of light energy, “warming” the Earth as we know it. According to the David Suzuki Foundation, a single flight’s carbon footprint can be equal to a car’s yearly emissions. It’s expected at the current rate emissions could grow to a whopping 300% over the current amount by 2050 – that’s over a billion tons of carbon dioxide (a common greenhouse gas) alone, per year. This isn’t even to mention the fact that such emissions are released at a higher altitude, virtually guaranteeing their presence for centuries to come.

 

Second, aircraft generate considerable noise and light in all phases – whether that be takeoff, landing, or during a cruise. Aside from the impact it can have on humans (in some cases contributing to sleeplessness, heart disease, and hypertension), the sounds and illumination necessary for aircraft safety disturb and disrupt populations of organisms reliant on a clear, quiet, and sometimes dark environment to survive – among these nocturnal species (such as owls) and migratory flocks of birds (like Canada geese) which stop over regularly during migration. Directly, data from the US’s Federal Aviation Administration show upwards of 40 bird strikes a day. Indirectly, airport staff regularly cull (a term for selective slaughter) bird populations around airports and flight paths to reduce the likelihood of such a strike, whereas other passive methods such as reducing food sources were found to be more effective.

 

Last but not least, the cost of building, maintaining, and eventually dismantling aircraft simply isn’t worth the environmental damage it wreaks. So far we’ve discussed how aircraft can have a tangible impact, but we haven’t covered how the suppliers work in tandem to keep them flying, with impacts of their own. As previously mentioned, aircraft require a lot of fuel, but where does that fuel come from, and what happens to it? After the oil is extracted from the ground in the first place, aircraft fuel, such as kerosene, is distilled through a process called “cracking” from heavy crude oil/petroleum, all of which requires an inordinate amount of fresh water and releases more GHGs into the air. Special chemical compounds used to de-ice aircraft can and will leach into nearby bodies of water, with compounds like glycols and acetates attracting microbial decomposers, which take oxygen from the water and deprive other organisms like fish of it, drastically altering the food web.

 

To a consumer, perhaps, all of this makes no difference – a cheap ticket price belies the true cost of visiting some far-off place that companies cleverly spin to make it as if it’s an inexpensive, quick, and one-in-a-lifetime chance to voyage to the exotic locale of your dreams. That stops here – read on to see what’s happening and how to get involved.

 

A great variety of solutions to the problems listed above are already being developed by the professionals. Biofuels and hydrogen fuels (known as SAFs – Sustainable Aviation Fuels) which produce significantly less or safe emissions, have been tested by airports (suppliers) as well as aircraft companies (consumers) in locations like Denmark, Australia, and Singapore. Speaking of airports, better air traffic control to make flights more efficient has been a point made by CANSO, the Civil Air Navigation Services Organisation – an international organisation representing air traffic controllers. As public opinion slowly turns against the pollution happening before our very eyes, companies, like Vancouver’s local seaplane service Harbour Air, have pledged to, or are already in, the process of offsetting their emissions and becoming carbon neutral.

 

Lastly, a crucial aspect that the fossil fuel industry uses to keep environmental movements in check is denial – not so much outright ignorance of the facts at hand, but discrediting and minimizing individual actions to the point where people begin to ask themselves the worth of their actions – that real change can only be accomplished by scientists and state actors. That’s false. 

 

Simple actions can range from booking economy to improve the aircraft’s efficiency, to taking a non-stop flight when possible to prevent emissions from takeoff and landing. Do your research as certain companies have better standards and will fly full loads of passengers per flight as a means to be more efficient with their fleet. Or, you could go the *ahem* extra mile and cut flying altogether, or fly only when it’s absolutely necessarily. In addition, when flying, you can purchase carbon offsets, which is money that you spend that goes towards preserving forests and other methods of capturing carbon so as to balance your footprint, though by how much it balances it is a matter of debate.

 

Even easier, you could sign petitions to governments or the International Civil Aviation Organisation (shockingly, international aviation isn’t exactly held accountable under the Paris Agreement, with the states signing and left to manage their own economic sectors to remain below the temperature limit) and elect climate-friendly politicians, as well as push for carbon pricing for jet aircraft in law, all of which you can do from the comfort of your own home or neighbourhood.

 

All of this article boils down to a central theme and tenet common in the fight for saving the Earth – making sure we are capable of differentiating what we need and what we want. Next time you or your parents are considering going somewhere, step back from the consumerism of it all and ask yourself – is this something I need and is it sustainable?

YHD Blogs – Clean Energy


This article is part of our “Youth Head Delegate Blog Series” — written by our YHDs! 


By Grace L. 

As we strive for a future dependant on renewable energy sources, every method has its pros and cons. 

Solar energy has become increasingly popular, growing 35-fold since 2008. However, some argue that the production of solar panels require fossil fuels and does more harm than good. This being said, cases show solar energy produces three or more times fewer emissions than fossil fuels while generating the same amount of energy. A 2017 study also shows solar panels producing 26 times the energy required to build and install them. The same thing could be said for wind turbines. Although many have claimed that the production of wind farms is destructive to the environment, the same 2017 survey shows wind turbines producing 44 times the energy required to build and install them. It is true that renewable energy sources still have a carbon footprint, but it is an improvement from fossil fuels. 

 

Many people are concerned about the materials of wind turbines. It takes 800 pounds of copper and rare Earth materials to produce a wind turbine. However, after some research, it is found that the key materials, steel and copper, can be recycled. The fibreglass blades still pose a problem, but the majority of wind turbines are recyclable. 

 

Similarly, people argue about electric vehicles. They say the battery is damaging to the Earth. Valid points can be made from this. Yes, batteries are harmful and the main material, aluminum, requires more energy to produce than steel. However, research has shown that electric cars are better for the environment. Additionally, aluminum is considered one of the most environmentally-friendly metals, able to be recycled many times. 

 

Furthermore, biomass has proved to be a destructive energy source. Biomass burns plant/animal materials to produce energy. The most common material to burn is wood, the very thing we get our oxygen from. Not only that, it is expensive, requires lots of space, and releases fossil fuels while in the burning process. It also produces particle pollution (soot). This can cause asthma attacks, strokes, heart attacks or death. Biomass can also release carbon monoxide, causing nausea, dizziness and sometimes, premature death. These effects can compare to the effects of wildfires. The problem is that many developing countries need it to provide cooking and heating. 

 

In the end, every energy source has its pros and cons. That being said, renewable energy sources have proven over and over again to be better for the environment, unless of course, it is biomass. It is hard to get people to transition away from fossil fuels after depending on them for a long time, but that is something we have to do to turn to cleaner options. Education is the first step in working together to better the future for everyone. 

YHD Blogs – Consumerism


This article is part of our “Youth Head Delegate Blog Series” — written by our YHDs! 


By Matthew K. 

Consumerism is the ideology that a person’s happiness is based on the quantity of goods and services obtained. On a day to day basis, we are all consumers. Whether we consume out of necessity or on the basis of indulgence, consumerism is a part of living in a capitalist society. However, through an analysis of this generation’s consumerism, it is clear that our habits and mass consumption is leading us towards a climate catastrophe. Therefore, in order to avoid the total destruction of our environment, we as a society need to become more conscious and considerate consumers.

In order to become conscious and considerate consumers, there are several methods that can be applied. The first, and arguably most important method is understanding how our consumerism affects the planet. This understanding will help consumers make more sustainably conscious choices as we actively work to rethink our purchases and put possible indirect outcomes into consideration. If we are to understand consumerism’s total effects on the planet, we must first look to the history of consumerism. According to the history of the human race, consumerism’s existence began in the 1600s. As a sign of early capitalistic ventures, Europeans craved more land– the Americas, Australia, Asia– to boost the production of their goods and services to stimulate their economy. While this evidently helped solidify the European empires, it had detrimental effects on the natural environments and Indigenous people of previously uncolonized land. This set the stage for the destruction that Western capitalism would cause in the centuries to come. Following the Industrial Revolution in 1760, the increase of capitalist ideals resulted in factories and mines that created countless amounts of product. Subsequently a middle class was developed as people could afford higher quality houses, education, and goods. Although this created huge advancements in the modernization of society, the Industrial Revolution substantially impacted the environment, and led to the depletion of natural resources. The factories and mines increased air and water pollution, as well as the use of fossil fuels. Today, as countries continue to industrialise and the impact of social media grows, our nature to consume has only heightened; thereby the environmental impacts have only become increasingly worse. According to research, an average American sees 6,000 to 10,000 ads a day from several different sources, such as phones, computers, and posters (Carr, 2020). With these advertisements, citizens are bombarded with product launches, sales, foods etc. These stimulations cause false senses of need for certain items through mob mentality and peer pressure. With several social media influencers showing a certain lifestyle, this had magnified the need to “consume” more. For example, the company Fashion Nova pays influencers to wear their product to encourage consumers to mimic their lifestyles. By using apps like Instagram, it has become easier for consumers to make instant purchases through in-app links. 

However, this increase in the speed and ease of purchasing has begun to override its negative effects. With an increase in Capitalism and Modernization, consequences are inevitable. As humans demand more products, the required goods produced are also enlarged.  Humankind uses 120% more resources than the Earth can produce. These resources include: water, oil, coal, forests and iron. According to the World Economic Forum, fast fashion brands such as Fashion Nova “make up 10% of humanity’s carbon emissions, dries up water sources, and pollutes rivers and streams” (McFall-Johnsen, 2020). Moreover, 85% of all textiles go to the dump each year (McFall-Johnsen, 2020). The industry’s impact on our environment exemplifies one of the many dire consequences of our generation’s consumerism. 

According to John Cairns, a professor in the department of biological sciences at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, there are three possible outcomes of our mass consumerism. “The Dismal Theory” and the “Utterly theory” are outcomes in which humankind is incapable of thriving. However the third option, “the moderately cheerful form of the Dismal Theorem”, expresses that humankind will articulate a solution to control consumption and population, allowing mankind to continue to prosper (Cairns ,2006). In order to adopt the third theorem, humanity must take the necessary steps to flourish. Controlling our consumption can be done through simple tasks such as supporting local businesses, looking for sustainable options and reducing household waste. Moreover, there is a movement towards living more consciously and considerately; with internet access, many people are able to learn about consumerism and how to live more sustainably. However, as humanity takes these steps to lessen our materialism, the responsibility must also be put on the government’s shoulders as they have enough influential power to enact change. Regulations must be put into place in order to protect consumers and the environment. 

As a historical analysis of consumerism demonstrates, it is apparent that modernization has become synonymous with consumerism. However, we know that with this ideology, comes dire consequences that will affect the earth’s livelihood in the near to distant future. If we continue on this path, we will inevitably face a global collapse and climate catastrophe. Yet, if we become more conscious and considerate consumers, there is hope of a brighter outcome, one which can lead to a more sustainable future when it comes to consumerism.

YHD Blogs – Nanoplastics


This article is part of our “Youth Head Delegate Blog Series” — written by our YHDs! 


By Erik W. 

Plastic is everywhere in our lives, visible and invisible. We are most familiar with plastics’ products—plastic bags, plastic straws, plastic balloons, plastic toys—but where these disposable products go we rarely know or care. Without any of us noticing, these plastics can slip through water treatment systems and landfills, breaking down into smaller and smaller pieces, but taking thousands of years to biodegrade. These tiny plastic particles can then spread across our ecosystems, poisoning anything they come into contact with. And that’s our topic today: Nanoplastics.

First off, let’s talk about what these nanoplastics are and where they come from. Currently, there is no strict definition yet (Bergmann, Gutow, & Klages, 2015, pp. 329-344), so let’s define nanoplastics as plastics with one dimension (length, width, or height) less than one micrometer (μm) or 10-6 m. That’s the what down, but you might be wondering where they come from. Well, plastics are used everywhere: in fact, over 280 million tons were created in 2011, and it is expected that this number will rise by 4% each year (PlasticsEurope, EuPC, EuPR, & EPRO, 2012.). In addition to the breakdown of these large plastics, nanoplastics are also directly created through things such as the spillage of nanoplastics in plastic plants and when airbrushing (João, Patrícia, Armando, & Teresa, 2016). Nanoplastics are everywhere in our ecosystems, so let’s discuss the harms of such a seemingly small product.

Nanoplastics have been shown to accumulate in various organs, inhibiting their functions, a well as being directly correlated to the decrease of survival rate of a species (Manabe, Tatarazako, & Kinoshita, 2011, pp. 576-581). In addition, nanoplastics may cause reduced vigor as well as slowing down the maturing process of individuals and ovulation process (João et al, 2016). Plus, these plastics frequently come with nanoplasticides, which are compounds added to plastics to make them more flexible. However, nanoplasticides are normally not chemically bound to the plastics, allowing them to easily leach from the plastics when they break down (João et al, 2016). This is dangerous because these materials are dissolvable in fat, so they can easily penetrate our membranes through first the penetration of the membranes of the food we eat (Bieber, Figge, & Koch, 1985, pp. 113-124). Within animal cells, these nanoplasticides are known to affect intracellular reactions and induce toxic effects (Hammer, Kraak, & Parsons, 2012, pp. 1-44), which is, for clear and obvious reasons, immensely dangerous.

As can be seen from the information, plastics that we can see everyday are dangerous enough—we all know the stories of turtles trapped in plastic and birds full of plastic—but when these plastics break down into smaller and smaller pieces, they don’t just disappear: they become even more deadly.

Exec Team Recipes: Nithila’s Greek Salad


As part of our team’s continuing commitment to sustainability in our everyday lives, we have launched a new series — Exec Team Recipes! On this blog, we’ll share our favourite vegan recipes. Enjoy!


By Nithila Theivendrarajah

Greek salads were one of the first dishes that I made as a kid, it taught me the basics of cooking: cutting vegetables. I made this with my childhood best friend everytime she came over. She was moved over from Greece and was one of the first people to get me behind a kitchen. Along with this great dish we would always make some tzatziki and have some pita bread. Although I am no longer in touch with this friend, this dish reminds me of my childhood. Whether you grew up making this or not, I’m sure you’ll find this dish simple yet flavorful. It’s fast and easy, great to eat right away or to pack for lunch. Enjoy! 

Prep time: 15 minutes

Yield: 2 people

Ingredients: 

  1. One Cucumber
  2. ½ Red pepper 
  3. ½ Green Pepper 
  4. ½ onion 
  5. ⅓ olives (from a can, precut) 
  6. Salt and pepper 
  7. Feta Cheese (around 50g) 
  8. ½ Oregano
  9. Red wine 1 tsp 
  10. Olive oil 1 ½ tsp 

Instructions: 

  1. Cut all vegetables into small cubes, and put into a bowl with pre-cut olives.
  2. Cut feta cheese into cubes and add to bowl.
  3. Add salt and pepper, red wine, oregano, olive oil and mix well into the bowl 
  4. Enjoy! 

Exec Team Recipes: Nahira’s Guacamole


As part of our team’s continuing commitment to sustainability in our everyday lives, we have launched a new series — Exec Team Recipes! On this blog, we’ll share our favourite vegan recipes. Enjoy!


By Nahira G-S

When my mom was in University, she lived for one year in Mexico. There, she learned from locals how to make AMAZING, fresh, and simple dishes. I can’t promise the recipe below is authentically Mexican, but it is definitely delicious. I grew up with this guacamole, and aside from peanut butter and apples, this was my favourite after-school snack. I started learning to cook around 8-10 years old, and this dish was one of the very first ones I asked my mom to teach me how to make. The green tomatillo sauce is my family’s secret ingredient, but I also added my own – chipotle chili pepper powder. This adds a little kick and helps to bring the flavours of the garlic, onion, and tomato together nicely.

Note: Guacamole is super flexible – really as long as you have avocados, you can add whatever ingredients you want! Hope you guys enjoy:)

Prep time: 20 min (12 if you’re super fast)  Serving size: 4-5 people as a snack

Ingredients: 

  • 4 perfectly ripe medium-large sized avocados 
  • 3 cloves of garlic minced 
  • ¼ of an onion minced (more is also okay) 
  • 1 full roma tomato (any large red tomato is perfect) 
  • ¾ of a cup of green tomatillo sauce 
  • Salt and pepper to taste 
  • ½ teaspoon of lemon juice
  • Optional: 1 teaspoon of chipotle chili pepper seasoning
    • This is not necessary, but it is my secret ingredient to an AMAZING guacamole

Equipment needed: 

  • Cutting board 
  • Large knife 
  • Smaller knife 
  • Big bowl 
  • Lemon juicer
  • Potato masher 
  • ¼ and ½ teaspoon measure
  • ¾ cup measure

Method: 

  • Mince garlic and onion, and add to a medium-large sized bowl 
  • Add three avocados, making sure that they are not too hard! 
  • Slice up the tomato into small, cubes and add to the bowl 
  • Pour in the green tomatillo sauce 
  • Season with pepper, salt, and chipotle chili (optional) 
  • Add the lemon juice (this keeps your guac fresh, but it is not completely necessary)
  • Take a potato masher (another utensil is fine too) and mix and mash all ingredients together 
  • Serve with a side of the tortilla, bean, or other chips of your choice! 
    • Tip: I also like to eat with carrots, cucumbers, or celery. You can also put this on toast for a yummy avocado toast! 
    • Tip: If you don’t think you can eat all the guac right away, save the pit of the avocado and put it in the bowl before covering it up!